Headrests / neckrests / neck rests / pillows /
appuis-nuque
in the collection of antique, classical, ethnic, ethnographic, ethno-tribal, native, traditional, tribal, so-called "primitive" art from Sub-Saharan black Africa

Clicking on a small photo brings you a bigger photo.

The attributions of the origin of the objects is based on their stylistic characteristics and/or on the data provided by the seller and/or experts, but of course certainty cannot be reached.

https://www.pinterest.com/vandergraaf/headrests-in-africa/ gives photos of many African headrests

Christiane Falgayrettes, à propos de l'objet-estampille de la Fondation Dapper, écrit:
Les appuis-tête présentent parfois des formes épurées qui semblent venir du fond de la mémoire humaine, révélant le corps de l'homme dans sa plénitude première. Son image apparaît furtivement ou s'ébauche à peine comme dans les oeuvres shona et mfinu; la composition en plans simplifiés, géométriques, et l'élimination de tout détail superflu permettent la synthèse des éléments qui fondent visuellement la métaphore. Peu de sculpteurs ont été capables d'amener, comme pour ces oeuvres, les formes à un tel degré de stylisation sans perte de vitalité dans la structure générale.
(In. Supports de rêves, page 55, à propos de l'appuie-nuque Mfinu Dapper reproduit page 59)








 

In many parts of central, western, and southern Africa, headrests were carved by their owners; while others were exquisitely crafted by professional carvers. These headrests often supported elaborate coiffures that were far too complex and time consuming to restyle on a daily basis. Hair was intricately braided or embellished with clay, beads, and other decorative materials. Small, wooden supports protected these styles during sleep, helping to preserve a hairstyle for weeks or even months at a time. Africans, however, were not the only ones to use headrests in order to preserve their hairstyles. During the Edo and Meiji periods (1603–1912) in Japan, hundreds of different hairstyles existed, especially among courtesans. A woman placed the support—a soft pillow atop a trapezoidal wooden base—under her neck so that the complex hair form that framed her face would remain intact. People all over the world spend nearly one-third of their lives sleeping, employing some type of pillow when resting. From ancient periods to modern times, humans have made rigid pillows from a wide variety of materials, including stone, clay, wood, and bamboo. Headrests were once a staple of domestic furniture, not only in many parts of Africa, but also in Asia and Oceania. Among the oldest known headrests are those from ancient Egypt. In life and the afterlife, ancient Egyptians slept with their heads on pillows of wood or alabaster. Eight headrests were found in the famous Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb. Although the earliest known headrests were found in Egypt, the Egyptians were not necessarily the first to have used them on the African continent. The dry, tomb climate helped preserve them; whereas, in damper regions south of the Sahara, wooden headrests would have rotted or succumbed to termites.

Daasanach woman using a wooden headrest 2008; Ethiopia; Photograph courtesy of Eric Lafforgue

Headrests served other purposes besides elevating the head and protecting hairstyles. They were often important indicators of one's status. In Africa and Oceania, headrests also acted as conduits to the ancestors where they were employed to invite spirits into dreams. In China, they served as funeral offerings. In fact, so many headrests were discovered in Chinese burial grounds that scholars once believed they were used solely for this purpose.

Within the constraints of their size and shape, these intimate objects reflect the aesthetics of their respective cultures and function in symbolic as well as utilitarian ways. This exhibition features African, East Asian, and Oceanic headrests from the collections of the Fowler Museum at UCLA—from Central African and Melanesian figurative, wooden headrests to Chinese delicately- glazed, porcelain and Japanese rattan-woven pillows.

- See more at: https://www.flysfo.com/museum/exhibitions/sleeping-beauties-headrests-fowler-museum-ucla#sthash.2PZ7Pezr.dpuf
In many parts of central, western, and southern Africa, headrests were carved by their owners; while others were exquisitely crafted by professional carvers. These headrests often supported elaborate coiffures that were far too complex and time consuming to restyle on a daily basis. Hair was intricately braided or embellished with clay, beads, and other decorative materials. Small, wooden supports protected these styles during sleep, helping to preserve a hairstyle for weeks or even months at a time. Africans, however, were not the only ones to use headrests in order to preserve their hairstyles. During the Edo and Meiji periods (1603–1912) in Japan, hundreds of different hairstyles existed, especially among courtesans. A woman placed the support—a soft pillow atop a trapezoidal wooden base—under her neck so that the complex hair form that framed her face would remain intact. People all over the world spend nearly one-third of their lives sleeping, employing some type of pillow when resting. From ancient periods to modern times, humans have made rigid pillows from a wide variety of materials, including stone, clay, wood, and bamboo. Headrests were once a staple of domestic furniture, not only in many parts of Africa, but also in Asia and Oceania. Among the oldest known headrests are those from ancient Egypt. In life and the afterlife, ancient Egyptians slept with their heads on pillows of wood or alabaster. Eight headrests were found in the famous Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb. Although the earliest known headrests were found in Egypt, the Egyptians were not necessarily the first to have used them on the African continent. The dry, tomb climate helped preserve them; whereas, in damper regions south of the Sahara, wooden headrests would have rotted or succumbed to termites.

Daasanach woman using a wooden headrest 2008; Ethiopia; Photograph courtesy of Eric Lafforgue

Headrests served other purposes besides elevating the head and protecting hairstyles. They were often important indicators of one's status. In Africa and Oceania, headrests also acted as conduits to the ancestors where they were employed to invite spirits into dreams. In China, they served as funeral offerings. In fact, so many headrests were discovered in Chinese burial grounds that scholars once believed they were used solely for this purpose.

Within the constraints of their size and shape, these intimate objects reflect the aesthetics of their respective cultures and function in symbolic as well as utilitarian ways. This exhibition features African, East Asian, and Oceanic headrests from the collections of the Fowler Museum at UCLA—from Central African and Melanesian figurative, wooden headrests to Chinese delicately- glazed, porcelain and Japanese rattan-woven pillows.

- See more at: https://www.flysfo.com/museum/exhibitions/sleeping-beauties-headrests-fowler-museum-ucla#sthash.2PZ7Pezr.dpuf
In many parts of central, western, and southern Africa, headrests were carved by their owners; while others were exquisitely crafted by professional carvers. These headrests often supported elaborate coiffures that were far too complex and time consuming to restyle on a daily basis. Hair was intricately braided or embellished with clay, beads, and other decorative materials. Small, wooden supports protected these styles during sleep, helping to preserve a hairstyle for weeks or even months at a time. Africans, however, were not the only ones to use headrests in order to preserve their hairstyles. During the Edo and Meiji periods (1603–1912) in Japan, hundreds of different hairstyles existed, especially among courtesans. A woman placed the support—a soft pillow atop a trapezoidal wooden base—under her neck so that the complex hair form that framed her face would remain intact. People all over the world spend nearly one-third of their lives sleeping, employing some type of pillow when resting. From ancient periods to modern times, humans have made rigid pillows from a wide variety of materials, including stone, clay, wood, and bamboo. Headrests were once a staple of domestic furniture, not only in many parts of Africa, but also in Asia and Oceania. Among the oldest known headrests are those from ancient Egypt. In life and the afterlife, ancient Egyptians slept with their heads on pillows of wood or alabaster. Eight headrests were found in the famous Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb. Although the earliest known headrests were found in Egypt, the Egyptians were not necessarily the first to have used them on the African continent. The dry, tomb climate helped preserve them; whereas, in damper regions south of the Sahara, wooden headrests would have rotted or succumbed to termites. - See more at: https://www.flysfo.com/museum/exhibitions/sleeping-beauties-headrests-fowler-museum-ucla#sthash.2PZ7Pezr.dpuf

https://www.flysfo.com/museum/exhibitions/sleeping-beauties-headrests-fowler-museum-ucla :
In many parts of central, western, and southern Africa, headrests were carved by their owners; while others were exquisitely crafted by professional carvers. These headrests often supported elaborate coiffures that were far too complex and time consuming to restyle on a daily basis. Hair was intricately braided or embellished with clay, beads, and other decorative materials. Small, wooden supports protected these styles during sleep, helping to preserve a hairstyle for weeks or even months at a time. Africans, however, were not the only ones to use headrests in order to preserve their hairstyles. During the Edo and Meiji periods (1603–1912) in Japan, hundreds of different hairstyles existed, especially among courtesans. A woman placed the support—a soft pillow atop a trapezoidal wooden base—under her neck so that the complex hair form that framed her face would remain intact. People all over the world spend nearly one-third of their lives sleeping, employing some type of pillow when resting. From ancient periods to modern times, humans have made rigid pillows from a wide variety of materials, including stone, clay, wood, and bamboo. Headrests were once a staple of domestic furniture, not only in many parts of Africa, but also in Asia and Oceania. Among the oldest known headrests are those from ancient Egypt. In life and the afterlife, ancient Egyptians slept with their heads on pillows of wood or alabaster. Eight headrests were found in the famous Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb. Although the earliest known headrests were found in Egypt, the Egyptians were not necessarily the first to have used them on the African continent. The dry, tomb climate helped preserve them; whereas, in damper regions south of the Sahara, wooden headrests would have rotted or succumbed to termites.
Headrests served other purposes besides elevating the head and protecting hairstyles. They were often important indicators of one's status. In Africa and Oceania, headrests also acted as conduits to the ancestors where they were employed to invite spirits into dreams. In China, they served as funeral offerings. In fact, so many headrests were discovered in Chinese burial grounds that scholars once believed they were used solely for this purpose.
Within the constraints of their size and shape, these intimate objects reflect the aesthetics of their respective cultures and function in symbolic as well as utilitarian ways.









 

Angola and Congo / DRC / formerly Zaire

Chokwe / Tchokwe / Cokwe or Ovumbundu / Ovimbundu or Lunda people

Headrest / neckrest / appui nuque / appuie nuque


Wood.
Shiny, soft, red-black patina, indicating long careful usage.
With geometric engravings on the circular base.
The central part consists of two parallel, rectangular panels, perforated in a geometric, regular pattern.

Bought from the collection of traditional African art of Gy Mateusen in Oud Turnhout, Belgium, in 2015.

Not available.

Special, scarce type.

Similar headrests:

A photo of a wooden headrest with a central par that shown geometrical perforations and a rectangular upper part, has been published without comments and is attributed to Ovimbundu?, Angola, on p. 85, in the book written by William J. Dewey, with contributions by various authors: Toshiko M. McCallum (Author), Jerome Feldman (Author), Henrietta Cosentino (Author)
Sleeping Beauties: The Jerome L. Joss Collection of African Headrests.
published by the Fowler Museum of Cultural History, University of California at Los Angeles
1993
214 pages
Language English
Product Dimensions: 27.9 x 21.6 x 1.9 cm
A collection of African Headrests in colour + B&W, together with descriptive text.
exhibition catalogue
Headrests have typically been seen as modest objects with a simple function -- to support the head during sleep.
On loan from the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History, "Sleeping Beauties" is drawn from the extraordinary collection of Jerome L. Joss.
The headrests are a superb study in the marriage of form and function - most are only 4-6 inches high.
Over 100 exquisite headrests, primarily from Africa (including Egypt) with smaller groupings from Asia and Oceania, were featured in this exhibition.
This catalogue opens with a Biography of Joss by Henrietta Cosentino, followed by four essays: Introduction to African Headrests and Catalogue by William Dewey; Declarations of Status and Conduits to the Spirits -- A Case Study of Shona Headrests and Catalogue by William Dewey; The Pillow in East Asia and Catalogue by Toshiko McCallum; Headrests of Oceania and Catalogue by Jerome Feldman.
The book has 151 full-color and black-and-white illustrations, plus 39 smaller duotone figures of the headrests.
A number of priceless masterpieces are depicted.
African carved wood examples included are by: Madi in Uganda; Tesso or Acoli or Lango in Northern Uganda; Somali in Somalia, Kenya; Pokot or Turkana in Kenya; Karamajong in Kenya; Rendille; Borana; Teke in Zaire; Yaka; Luba; Zela; Swazi in Swaziland; Ovumbundu in Angola; Akan in Ghana; Fulani in Guinea; Tellem in Mail; Central Shona in Zimbabwe; Tsonga in Mozambique.
Chinese, Japanese and Korean examples are ceramic, lacquered wood and silk, bamboo, wood and woven rattan from the 12th-20th centuries. Oceanic examples are wood from Java, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Tonga and Fiji.
The book concludes with Bibliographies (one each for Africa, Asia, and Oceania).
Paperback
ISBN-10: 0930741285
ISBN-13: 978-0930741280

The rectangular forms of the upper part and the central part, and the conical shape of the lower part, make this object similar to the headrests from the Himba, who live also in Angola and Namibia; however, the wood, patina and elaborate, fine geometrical decorations are different from Himba headrests.









 

The rectangular forms of the upper part and the central part, and the conical shape of the lower part, plus the geometric decorations of the central part make this headrest similar to a headrest from Tanzania in the National Museum of Schotland
http://www.nms.ac.uk/explore/collection-search-results/?item_id=336777











 

Anitra Nettleton
AFRICAN DREAM MACHINES: STYLE, IDENTITY AND MEANING OF AFRICAN HEADRESTS
South Africa
Publisher: WITS UNIVERSITY PRESS
2007
Pages: 352
Paperback
ISBN 10: 1868144585
ISBN 13: 9781868144587
Description:
African headrests have been moved out of the category of functional objects and into the more rarefied category of 'art' objects. Styles in African headrests are usually defined in terms of western art and archaeological discourses, but this book interrogates these definitions of style through a case study of headrests of the 'Tellem' of Mali.
Synopsis:
"African Dream Machines" questions the assumed one-to-one relationship between formal styles and ethnic identities or classifications. The notion of 'authenticity' as a fixed value in relation to African art is de-stabilised, while historical factors are used to demonstrate that 'authenticity', in the form sought by collectors of antique African art, is largely a construct, which has no basis in historical reality.
The final chapter seeks to understand the significance of African headrests in relation to a number of different perspectives: the western fascination with the headrest as a synecdoche for "otherness"; their iconography in terms of subject matter (human and animal figures); and the ways in which headrests are used as support to the head of a sleeping person.
Each of the many headrests discussed is illustrated in a drawing by the author.

Une somme impressionnante d'informations sur tous les types d'appui-nuques Africains.
Indispensable documentation pour les collectionneurs.

Étudie les relations linéaires entre les styles formels et les identités ethniques ou leur classifications. La notion d’ « authenticité » est une constante dans les rapports à l'art africain, elle est ici remise en cause lorsque des facteurs historiques sont employés pour démontrer que l’ authenticité , sous la forme recherchée par les collecteurs d'art africain est en grande partie une construction, qui n'a aucune base dans la réalité historique. Ce livre permet de comprendre l'importance des appuis-tête africains par rapport à différentes perspectives : la fascination occidentale avec l'appui-tête comme synecdoque de l’ altérité ; leur iconographie en termes de thèmes (symboles humains et animaux) ; et la façon dont les appuis-tête sont utilisés comme support de la tête d'une personne endormie.
Chacun des nombreux appuis-tête étudiés est illustré par des dessins de l'auteur, ou des photos.

on p. 250, Nettleton has written:

Central African variants:

...In these there are effectively two panels with long sides parallel to each other and to the length of the platform, and each panel has a geometric relief carving on its outer surface, which has been turned into fretwork in the example in figure 272.  ...

That figure 272 is a drawing of a headrest from Congo, Lunda people, published in

Maes, Joseph
Les Appuis-tetes du Congo Belge.
Annales du Musee du Congo Belge, series 6, vol. 2, no. 4
Tervuren
Royal Museum for Central Africa
1929










 


394 Neckrest
D. R. Congo, Chokwe
wood, shiny middle brown patina, an open worked rectangular base, two continuous struts with carved ornaments are supporting a slightly curved seat decorated with incisions, min. dam., slight signs of usage; those neckrests were used as pillows and should preserve the elaborate coiffures at night. They identified their owner concerning rank and membership to a certain clan.
H: 14 cm; L: 41,5 cm
H: 5.5 inch; L: 16.3 inch
Provenance
Pace Gallery, New York, USA
Sold 1500 eur hammer price
Zemanek Munster auctions, 2008-03.

Chokwe, Zaire
394 Nackenstütze
Holz, mittelbraune Glanzpatina, auf durchbrochene längsrechteckige Basis gearbeitet, zwei durchgehende Seitenstützen mit geschnitzten Ornamenten tragen eine nach außen leicht aufgewölbte rechteckige Sitzfläche mit Ritzverzierungen, min. besch., leichte Gebrauchsspuren;
diese Nackenstützen dienten als eine Art Kopfkissen und sollten die kunstvollen Frisuren davor bewahren im Schlaf zerdrückt oder zerzaust zu werden, gleichzeitig identifizierten sie auch ihren Besitzer hinsichtlich des Ranges und der Klanzugehörigkeit.









 


Angola, Chokwe headrest.
Sold by Native Auctions, Brussels, Belgium, 2015, 1600 Euro.








 


Ethiopia


 

http://www.ericlafforgue.com :
The headrest is a symbol of Oromo culture, Ethiopia.
In Omo Valley, men never move without taking their headrest.
It is made of wood and consists, most of the time, in a slightly curved tray (reminding the shape of a saddle) fixed on a vertical and recangular shape support base, ending with an hemispheric hollowed out base. It is possible for them to carry it everywhere owing to a leather strip tied to the support based. It is mainly used as a pillow in order to rest on the ground and keeping the clay headdres intact. It also prevents insects from introducing in the ears. It can also be used as a stool, a beaker (using the base) or to sharpen a knife (on the tray).

Headrest is important in the culture of several Omo Valley ethnic groups such as the Kara, the Bashada, the Daasanach, the Hamar, the Nyangatom, the Suri and the Mursi. In those cultures it is supposed to be the men’s privilege to carry headrests (except from the Bashada, whose women and children have headrests).

It is a symbolic object as young men are only allowed to own it when they become adults and receive it during passage rituals (like circumcision for the young Dassanach men), in the same way as their spear or clay headdress.

The headrest is clearly associated with the clay headdress as it is used to lie down when the headdress is made.

Headrests also have different shapes, having one, two or three legs from a tribe to another. In some tribes men have to make their headrest themselves whereas in others they ask them to a specialized craftsman or even to another ethnic group (the Dassanach for example buy them from the Karas or the Hamars).

The Nyangatom headrest with a rectangular shaped tray has spread up north to the Suri and the Mursi, whereas the two leg headrest was adopted by the young Dassanach men and the three leg one by the young Bashada, both during the initiation phase.



Dozens of Ethiopian ethnic groups and subgroups use headrests.
Within some groups styles vary according to gender and age group while in other regions styles are shared between distinct tribes.
http://www.amyas.net/thumbs.php?catid=2 in 2014







 

Specific people or region not known

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


High-density wood.
Nice patina.

Not available; sold for 130 Euro.









 

Gurage / Gurague / Gourague or Oromo people

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


High-density wood.
Great patina.

Not available; sold for 170 Euro.

A similar headrest has been classified as Oromo(?) in the catalogue:
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g








 

https://www.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/appui-nuque/5289-appuie-nuque-gurage-gourague-ethiopie.html

Appuie Nuque - Gurage / Gourague - Ethiopie
Ces objets sont souvent décrits comme des supports destinés à protéger des coiffures élaborées, les coiffures prenant souvent de longues heures voire de longs jours pour être réalisées. Mais les coiffures ne sont pas seulement une parure : elles dignifient et signalent l'âge, le genre, le statut social à qui sait les lire. Bien souvent encore, elles servent de support à des signes et symboles magico-religieux.
Caractéristiques









 

Headrest / neckrest, pillow; triangular design with engravings


Bought from the collection of Johan Visker, expert in Ethiopian art, Belgium, in 2013.

Not available.

Similar headrests have been attributed to Oromo(?) in the catalogue:
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g







 

Headrest / neckrest decorated with beads

Wood.

Probably Gurage.

Bought in 2013.

Not available.








 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone


Heavy wood.
Almost black.
Exceptionally high quality and therefore scarce.

Bought personally from Lalibela Gallery, Addis Ababa, capital city of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.

The headrests from Ethiopia with a base in the form of 1 or 2 cones / skirts with engravings are mainly attributed to the Gurage / Gurague / Gourague (or Oromo) people in the center of Ethiopia.







 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone

 
High-density wood.
Almost black.
Smooth, silky patina, and therefore high quality and high price.
In view of the silky surface, probably an old, well used piece.

Bought from Lalibela Gallery, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015-03.

Available: 530 Euro.

The headrests from Ethiopia with a base in the form of 1 or 2 cones / skirts with engravings are mainly attributed to the Gurage / Gurague / Gourague (or Oromo) people in the center of Ethiopia.







 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone



Almost black.
Smooth, silky patina, and therefore high quality and high price.

Bought from Lalibela Gallery, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015-03.

Not available.

The headrests from Ethiopia with a base in the form of 1 or 2 cones / skirts with engravings are mainly attributed to the Gurage / Gurague / Gourague (or Oromo) people of Ethiopia.







 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone

 
Smooth, silky patina, and therefore high quality and high price.

Bought from Lalibela Gallery, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015-03.

The headrests from Ethiopia with a base in the form of 1 or 2 cones / skirts with engravings are mainly attributed to the Gurage / Gurague / Gourague (or Oromo) people in the center of Ethiopia.






 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone



Smooth, silky patina, and therefore high quality and high price.

Bought from Lalibela Gallery, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015-03.

Not available.

The headrests from Ethiopia with a base in the form of 1 or 2 cones / skirts with engravings are mainly attributed to the Gurage / Gurague / Gourague (or Oromo) people in the center of Ethiopia.









 

Similar headrests:

A headrest has been published as Gurage? in the book
by William J. Dewey, with contributions by various authors: Toshiko M. McCallum (Author), Jerome Feldman (Author), Henrietta Cosentino (Author)
Sleeping Beauties: The Jerome L. Joss Collection of African Headrests
published by the Fowler Museum of Cultural History, University of California at Los Angeles
1993
214 pages
Language English
Product Dimensions: 27.9 x 21.6 x 1.9 cm
A collection of African Headrests in colour + B&W, together with descriptive text.
exhibition catalogue







 

Similar headrests are classified as Gurague or Oromo in the catalogue:
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g








 

A similar headrest has been published as representative for Gurage / Gurague Sebatbet Style 10
in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique








 

A headrest in the national Museum of Scotland, GB:









 

A headrest offered for sale by Toguna gallery in France, as "Ancien appui-nuque Guragé Sebatbét":











 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on 2 cones/skirts


High-density wood.
Reddish black, nice patina.
On 2 cones/skirts.

Bought from Lalibela Gallery, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015-03.

Not available.









Similar objects:

Amhara headrest, Metropolitan Museum, New York, USA:









 

A headrest on 2 cones, Oromo, sold for $875 at auction by Bonham's in 2012<
Provenance: Michael Rhodes, New York Marc & Denyse Ginzberg, New York
Published: Ginzberg, Marc, African Forms, Skira Editore, Italy, 2000, p 37 :









 

A similar headrest has been published as representative for Gurage / Gurague Sebatbet Style 12
in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique







 

https://www.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/appui-nuque/3697-appuie-nuque-gurage-gourague-ethiopie.html :

Appuie Nuque - Gurage / Gourague - Ethiopie
Ces objets sont souvent décrits comme des supports destinés à protéger des coiffures élaborées, les coiffures prenant souvent de longues heures voire de longs jours pour être réalisées. Mais les coiffures ne sont pas seulement une parure : elles dignifient et signalent l'âge, le genre, le statut social à qui sait les lire. Bien souvent encore, elles servent de support à des signes et symboles magico-religieux. En savoir plus ...
Caractéristiques:
Ethnie : Gurague / Gurage
Pays d'origine : Éthiopie
Zone de collecte : Éthiopie, Addis Abeba
Ancienneté présumée : entre 1950 et 1960
Aspect de surface : d'usage
Etat apparent : très bon état
Etat de conservation : dans son jus
Appartenance : collecte in situ
Hauteur, en cm : 17
Poids, en grammes : 406









 

For sale from Karlsson & Wickman for 700 Euro
http://www.karlssonandwickman.com/tribal-art-products/ :











 

A headrest on 2 cones, sold by Thomas Murray, http://www.tmurrayarts.com/about/bio/ :









 

Omo Valley, Me'en / Bodi people, in the South of Ethiopia

Seat/stool or/and headrest/neckrest/pillow


 
Wood.
Nice patina.
Old, well used.

This kind of seat rests on 1 or 2 or 3 or 4 pillars/legs; this type on 4 legs is relatively scarce.
Large in comparison with stools of similar form.
This type of stool of oval shape with incisions at both sides, is attributed by experts mainly to people living in the Omo Valley and more particularly to the Me'en / Bodi.
Such small seats are named Chakam or Chakkam.

Bought personally from Lalibela gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.







 

Seat/stool or/and headrest/neckrest/pillow


Wood.
Nice patina.
Old, well used.
Holes for a handle.

Large in comparison with stools of similar form.
This type of stool of oval shape with incisions at both sides, is attributed by experts mainly to people living in the Omo Valley and more particularly to the Me'en / Bodi.
Such small seats are named Chakam or Chakkam.

Bought personally from Lalibela gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.







 

Similar seats:

Photos of similar seats have been published in the book; they have been attributed to the Me'en people and are named "chakam":
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
abondamment illustré en n/b
broché
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen:
--Introduction
--Groupes culturels
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Le catalogue le plus complet sur les objets d'Ethiopie.
Poids = 700 g









Offered for sale at an auction by Walu in Zurich, Switzerland, in 2007.
NACKENSTÜTZE
Sudan. H 13.5 cm. CHF 400.- / 500.- (€ 382.- / 477.-)
unsold








 

Three headrests of similar shape have been attributed to the Me'en/Bodi people on p. 103-104
in the book by Pierre Loos, Thomas Bayet et Sophie Caltaux
La tête dans les étoiles: Appuie-nuques du monde
Brussels : BRUNEAF
2012
168 pp.
exhibition catalog
du 6 au 10 juin 2012
Les caves de la nonciature
7 Rue des Sablons - Place du Grand Sablon
1000 - Brussels
Belgium









 

A few similar headrests have been published and attributed to the Me'en people, in the book
Eduardo Lopez Moreno
Wooden Dreams: East African Headrests
Milano
5 Continents Editions
2015
25x287x249 mm
1,77 kg
268 color illustrations
Format: Hardcover
ISBN10 8874397062
ISBN13 9788874397068









 

Similar headrests have also been published as representatives for creations from the Omo Valley region - Me'en people, in the book by
Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna,
2016 
http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique








 

Oromo / Oromia people

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone


High-density wood.
Great, black patina.

Bought personally from Lalibela Gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Available: 520 Euro.

Similar headrests are classified as Oromo(?) in the catalogue:
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g









Headrest of this form are attributed to the Oromo people on p. 76 in the book by Pierre Loos, Thomas Bayet et Sophie Caltaux
La tête dans les étoiles: Appuie-nuques du monde
Brussels : BRUNEAF 2012
168 pp.
exhibition catalog du 6 au 10 juin 2012 Les caves de la nonciature 7 Rue des Sablons - Place du Grand Sablon 1000 - Brussels Belgium








 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone

 
Medium-density wood.
Well-used, old.

Bought personally from Lalibela Gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.








 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow on a cone


Wood with silky, soft patina.
2 parts assembled.

Shape and surface are typical for Oromo people from the region near the town Jimma.

Bought from Willy Peters, collector of traditional African art in Turnhout, Belgium, 2017-04; he bought this headrest in Ethiopia and cleaned it.

Not available.






 

Similar headrests are classified as Oromo(?) in the catalogue:
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g









Headrest of this form are attributed to the Oromo people
in the book by Pierre Loos, Thomas Bayet et Sophie Caltaux
La tête dans les étoiles: Appuie-nuques du monde
Brussels : BRUNEAF 2012
168 pp.
exhibition catalog du 6 au 10 juin 2012 Les caves de la nonciature 7 Rue des Sablons - Place du Grand Sablon 1000 - Brussels Belgium








Similar headrests have also been published as representatives for Oromo from the region around the city Jimma, in the book
Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique










 

Oromo / Oromia people from the region Arsi / Arussi (or Kambatta)

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Medium-density wood.
Nice patina.
Engravings on the sides, on the outer legs.
One of the most classical types of headrest from Ethiopia.
Typical form for the Arsi people, with a central part that stands for 2 legs.

Bought from the collection of Johan Visker, expert in Ethiopian art, Belgium, in 2013.










 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Wood.
This form is quite common and easy to find.
Typical form for the Oromo people from the Arsi region, with a central part that stands for 2 legs.
This particular one is made of high-density wood and offers a smooth silky, red-brown patina; that elevates the quality and the price of this headrest far above average.

Bought personally from Lalibela Gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.








 

Similar headrests:











 

Gallery Image
Wooden headrest
Ethiopia, Gurage or Arsi
First half of the twentieth century or later
Wooden headrest on a convex ridged base with two flat supports on the outside joining the base to the end of the slightly asymmetrical platform, which has a convex surface plane. The central support is pierced by two vertical rectangular openings, the bases and the support are decorated with a richly incised pattern, which is quite structural in its form and composed of either parallel lines or fishbone motifs. There is a white pigment filling the incised decoration, and the upper plane has dark stains from the oily upper platform.
Private Collection loan 14
Headrests... have survived more or less continuously over almost 5000 years, with recorded evidence stretching from Ancient Egypt and Nubia to the Garamantes in Libya in Roman times, the Tellem in Mali (the latter from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries), and to Zimbabwe, from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries.
In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, headrests were widely collected in a vast area stretching from Nubia in Sudan, to Zaire and to South Africa including Namibia; in West Africa, they are found among the Tellem and the Dogons, the Bobo, Nuna, Dagari, Lobi, but also the Akan and the Baule. They show a great diversity, reflecting the variety of African styles and cultures, but also traditions matched by innovations.
When he arrived in Sudan, the French explorer Fréderic Cailliaud (1787-1869) discovered that the inhabitants were still using wooden headrests. From 1819 to 1822, he travelled through Nubia as far as the sixth Nile cataract, discovering on the way Meroe, the ancient city on the east bank of the river, near the modern town of Shendi. In Shendi, he found headrests very similar to those he had seen under the heads of Ancient Egyptian mummies on the wall paintings and reliefs of the Theban tombs. “It provides”, he claims, “a good rest on which the Nubians sleep peacefully. In Sennar too, on the bank of the Blue Nile and not too far from Ethiopia, they still used similar ones instead of pillows”.
The more recent African headrests in this exhibition were first brought to Europe by travelers and residents in the first part of the twentieth century.
http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/gallery/headrests/gallery/3/index.html









 

A similar headrest has been published as Kambatta?, Arussi? in the book
by William J. Dewey, with contributions by various authors: Toshiko M. McCallum (Author), Jerome Feldman (Author), Henrietta Cosentino (Author)
Sleeping Beauties: The Jerome L. Joss Collection of African Headrests
published by the Fowler Museum of Cultural History, University of California at Los Angeles
1993
214 pages
Language English
Product Dimensions: 27.9 x 21.6 x 1.9 cm
A collection of African Headrests in colour + B&W, together with descriptive text.
exhibition catalogue








 

A similar headrest has been published and classified as Arsi in the catalogue:
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g








Two headrests of similar shape have been attributed also to the Arsi people on p. 85
in the book by Pierre Loos, Thomas Bayet et Sophie Caltaux
La tête dans les étoiles: Appuie-nuques du monde
Brussels : BRUNEAF
2012
168 pp.
exhibition catalog
du 6 au 10 juin 2012
Les caves de la nonciature
7 Rue des Sablons - Place du Grand Sablon
1000 - Brussels
Belgium









 

A similar headrest is published as representative for Oromo of Arussi Style in the book by
Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique








 

A similar headrest classified as Arsi or Kambatta by Bruno Mignot, dealer in France:









 

A similar headrest attributed to Arsi, for sale from design-africa for 300 $
http://www.design-africa.net/index.php?/objects/neckrestsheadrests/ :









 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Medium-density-wood.
Nice patina.

This type is scarce and the origin is not clear. For instance, this type is not represented in the great overview of headrests from Ethiopia, namely the book by Odilon Audouin, APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa, Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique
The flat shape with legs in one plane comes close to the many headrests that are attributed to Oromo Arsi or Kambata/Kambatta.

Bought personally from Lalibela gallery in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.









 

Oromo / Oromia people from the region Kambatta / Kembatta or Arsi / Arusi, or Gurage / Gurague people

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Medium-density-wood.

Bought from a collection in Paris in 2016.

Not available.

This type is attributed by numerous experts and dealers to the region Oromo Kambatta or Arsi

Similar headrests have been published and classified as Arsi or Gurage/Gurague in the catalogue:
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g







 

https://www.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/appui-nuque/2164-appuie-nuque-kembatta-kambatta-ethiopie.html:

Appuie Nuque - Kembatta / Kambatta - Ethiopie.
Ces objets sont souvent décrits comme des supports destinés à protéger des coiffures élaborées, les coiffures prenant souvent de longues heures voire de longs jours pour être réalisées. Mais les coiffures ne sont pas seulement une parure : elles dignifient et signalent l'âge, le genre, le statut social à qui sait les lire. Bien souvent encore, elles servent de support à des signes et symboles magico-religieux.
Caractéristiques:











 

Oromo / Oromia people from the region Karrayyu / Karayyu / Karraya / Karayu / Karaju / Kereyu / Keruyu

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


High-density wood, which is typical for a Karrayyu headrest.
This type of headrest is assigned in several publications printed and on the internet to the Karrayu people.

Bought in a shop / gallery in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.










 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


High-density wood, which is typical for a Karrayyu headrest.
This type of headrest is assigned in several publications printed and on the internet to the Karrayu people.

Bought in a gallery / shop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.






 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


High-density wood, which is typical for a Karrayyu headrest.
This type of headrest is assigned in several publications printed and on the internet to the Karrayu people.

Bought in a gallery / shop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Available: 240 Euro.







 

A similar headrest is classified as Oromo in the catalogue:
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Poids = 700 g







 

A similar headrest is described as originating from the Oromo people of the Arsi region
http://www.amyas.net/thumbs.php?catid=2 :


Oromo Headrest Arsi/shashemene
Dozens of Ethiopian ethnic groups and subgroups use headrests. Within some groups styles vary according to gender and age group while in other regions styles are shared between distinct tribes. Headrests of this style which resemble pharaonic examples thousands of years old, come from Oromo, in central Ethiopia. Oromo/Arsi headrests of this type from the Shashemene are generally reddish in color, decorated with etched patterns, flat in form with a vertical central perforation and an oily patina. This particular example has especially lovely markings and a well balanced form. 6" tall. Price on request.







 

A similar headrest is published and described also as Karayyu:
http://www.africanheadrests.com/karayyu.htm










 

A similar headrest has been offered for sale at an auction:









 

Similar headrest also attributed to Oromo Karrayyu, for sale for 300 $,
http://www.design-africa.net/index.php?/objects/neckrestsheadrests/ :

 








 

A similar headrest has been published as Oromo Karayyu in the book
by Pierre Loos, Thomas Bayet et Sophie Caltaux
La tête dans les étoiles: Appuie-nuques du monde
Brussels : BRUNEAF
2012
168 pp.
exhibition catalog
du 6 au 10 juin 2012
Les caves de la nonciature
7 Rue des Sablons - Place du Grand Sablon
1000 - Brussels
Belgium







 

A similar headrest has been sold together with other headrests, at auction in 2014:









 

The headrests above are similar to the headrest that is shown as example of the class that is named Oromo Karrayyu Style 1 in the book by Odilon Audouin, APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa, Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique









 

A similar headrest is offered for sale in 2017:
http://www.beprimitive.com/Collections/Artifacts/African/african-artifacts/A0607-134

Gurage People
Ethiopia, East Africa
Mid / Late 19th C. Carved
Wood
$395







 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow

 
High-density wood, colour and shape/form, all typical Oromo Karrayyu.
Scarce type of high quality.

Bought from a private collection in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.









 

A simlar headrest has been published online also as Karayyu:
http://www.africanheadrests.com/karayyu.htm









 

A few similar headrests are shown as examples of the class named Karrayyu in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa, Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique








 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow

 
Scarce type and an object of high quality.

In view of the high-density wood, the colour and the shape/form, the origin is probably Karayyu.
A few similar headrests are shown as originating from the Karrayyu in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa, Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique

Bought personally from an Ethiopian art gallery in Churchill Street, the main street of galleries in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015-03, as the best piece for sale at that time.

Not available.









 

Sidamo or Oromo or Konso or Dasanetch people

Headrest / neckrest / pillow

  
Attributed to the Afar people by the seller/dealer, but according to expert dealers of the leading galleries in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, this type should be attributed to Sidamo people.

Very solid, heavy, dense wood.

Not available.








 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Wood.
Nice patina and color and structure of the wood.

Bought from a gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

According to the seller/dealer, the origin is Sidamo people.
This agrees with other experts who attribute this type of headrest to Sidamo.

Not available.








 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


High density wood.
Well used, old.
Scarce type of headrest.

Bought in Brussels during BRUNEAF 2015,
from Martial Bronsin, Antiquites Arts primitifs
Bronsin.martial@skynet.be 
4 Impasse Saint Jacques
1000 Brussel BELGIUM

Not available.

A similar, more refined headrest is part of the collection of Johan Visker, Belgium.

A similar headrest has been published also as created by the Oromo people:
http://www.africanheadrests.com/oromo.htm#










This headrest has been published on the WWW by Dogon Galery, attributed to the Sidamo people.








 


This headrest has been offered for sale on the WWW, attributed to the Sidamo people.






 

A headrest of similar shape but with light colour has been attributed to the Dasanetch people on p. 111
in the book by Pierre Loos, Thomas Bayet et Sophie Caltaux
La tête dans les étoiles: Appuie-nuques du monde
Brussels : BRUNEAF
2012
168 pp.
exhibition catalog
du 6 au 10 juin 2012
Les caves de la nonciature
7 Rue des Sablons - Place du Grand Sablon
1000 - Brussels
Belgium









 


This similar old headrest has been classified as used by the Konso people, who live mainly in South Ethiopia and also in North Kenya, and has been published in the book
Eduardo Lopez Moreno
Wooden Dreams: East African Headrests
Milano
5 Continents Editions
2015
25x287x249 mm
1,77 kg
268 color illustrations
Format: Hardcover
ISBN10 8874397062
ISBN13 9788874397068








 

One similar but more refined and less used headrest with engravings is published in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE Headrests from the Horn of Africa, Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique 
This is classified as Oromo people, subgroup Borana = Boran.










 

Oromo or Gurage people?

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


High density wood.
Nice, silky, shining, patina.
Scarce type.
Upper part shaped like the moon.

Has been sold to me as probably from the Oromo region, but one similar headrest has been attributed to the neighbouring Gurage / Gurague Sebatbet as Style 10
in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique

Bought from a collection in Paris, France, in 2016.

Not available.









 

Silte / Selti / Silti people

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silt%27e_people
The Silt'e people also Silte people (ስልጤ; simplified form: Silte) are an ethnic group in southern Ethiopia. They inhabit today's Silt'e Zone which is part of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Region. Silt'e denote their origin to the city of Harar.[3] A considerable number of Silt'e live in Addis Ababa, Adama and other cities and smaller urban centres of southern Ethiopia where they make a living, e.g., as merchants or keepers of petty shops. In the countryside the Silt'e practise mixed farming and cultivate ensete. The term Silt'e is the modern ethnonym of the speakers of the Silt'e language.
 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow

 
High density wood.
Almost black,
Nice, silky, shining, patina.
Scarce type.

Bought personally from Lalibela Gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, 2015-03.

Available: 540 Euro.









Similar pieces:
 


http://www.audouinheadrests.com/archives
Silt'e headrest








 


Bonhams
Lot 197 Oromo Neckrest, Ethiopia
Sold for US$ 812 (€724) inc. premium
African, Oceanic and Pre-Columbian Art
15 May 2013
New York, USA








 

Very similar to the headrest shown as Silte / Selti Type 1
in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique
Also shown on the cover of the book:











Similar headrests in the Calverton collection
http://www.africanheadrests.com/silte.htm#
are also attributed to Silte:










 

http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/headrest-494934:


Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Headrest

African, Ethiopia, Unknown peoples mid-20th century Dimensions

Overall: 16.5 cm (6 1/2 in.) Accession Number

2006.2056 Medium or Technique

Wood Not On View Collections

Africa and Oceania Classifications

Seating and beds

Provenance:
Between 2000 and 2006, acquired by Timothy Phillips, Boston [see note]; 2006, year-end gift of Timothy Phillips to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 24, 2007)
NOTE: Probably purchased from a dealer in Paris, Brussels, or New York.
Credit Line
Gift of Timothy Phillips









 


Ethiopia & Eritrea & Djibouti, in East Africa

Afar / Aafar / Hafar / Danakil people

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Low-density wood and light color.
Nice patina.

Bought from an art dealer in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Similar headrests have been published and attributed to the Afar people in the book
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
abondamment illustré en n/b
broché
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen:
--Introduction
--Groupes culturels
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Le catalogue le plus complet sur les objets d'Ethiopie.
Poids = 700 g

There we read that such headrests are named "fidena".

Not available.








 

Similar headrests:

A similar headrest has been published and attributed to the Afar people, in the book
Eduardo Lopez Moreno
Wooden Dreams: East African Headrests
Milano
5 Continents Editions
2015
25x287x249 mm
1,77 kg
268 color illustrations
Format: Hardcover
ISBN10 8874397062
ISBN13 9788874397068









 

A similar headrest has been published as representative for headrests from the Afar in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique










 

http://tribalgatheringlondon.com/gallery/page/5/ in 2017:

Afar region. Ethiopia.
19th to early 20th century.
H – 15 cm L – 15.5 cm.
£250







 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Low- density wood. This is in accordance with the attribution to the Afar people by the seller of this headrest.
More concretely, the seller attributed this headrest to the Afar people, region / subgroup Karan / Karai.
Karan = Keren is located north of Ethiopia in Eritrea.
Very scarce style.

Bought personally from the big Zebra gallery in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, 2015-03.

Not available.

A similar headrest is published as representative for Afar Style 5 in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique










 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


The light-density wood and the shape / form / style indicate as origin the Afar people.
Scarce style.

Bought in 2017-04 from a collector of African art in Turnhout, Belgium, who bought the headrest directly from the user / owner on a market in the North of Ethiopia.

Not available.









 

Similar headrests have been published and attributed to the Afar people in the book
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
abondamment illustré en n/b
broché
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen:
--Introduction
--Groupes culturels
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Le catalogue le plus complet sur les objets d'Ethiopie.
Poids = 700 g










Similar headrest:
https://www.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/appui-nuque/2513-appuie-nuque-afar-danakil-ethiopie.html:

Appuie Nuque - Afar / Danakil - Ethiopie
Ces objets sont souvent décrits comme des supports destinés à protéger des coiffures élaborées, les coiffures prenant souvent de longues heures voire de longs jours pour être réalisées.
Mais les coiffures ne sont pas seulement une parure : elles dignifient et signalent l'âge, le genre, le statut social à qui sait les lire.










 

Somewhat similar headrests have been published as Afar in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE - Headrests from the Horn of Africa,
Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique










 


Ethiopia & Somalia & Djibouti & Eritrea, in East Africa

Somali or Afar/Aafar/Danakil people

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Light, low-density wood and semi-circular style / shape, typical for the headrests made by the Somali or Afar people.

Bought personally from the big Zebra gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available.







 

Headrest / neckrest / pillow


Low-density wood.
Semi-circular style / shape.
Typical for the headrests made by the Somali or Afar people.

Not available.







 

https://www.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/appui-nuque/3417-appuie-nuque-afar-danakil-ethiopie.html :

Appuie Nuque - Afar / Danakil - Ethiopie
Ces objets sont souvent décrits comme des supports destinés à protéger des coiffures élaborées, les coiffures prenant souvent de longues heures voire de longs jours pour être réalisées. Mais les coiffures ne sont pas seulement une parure : elles dignifient et signalent l'âge, le genre, le statut social à qui sait les lire. Bien souvent encore, elles servent de support à des signes et symboles magico-religieux. En savoir plus ...
Caractéristiques:
Ethnie : Afar / Danakil
Pays d'origine : Djibouti
Zone de collecte : Djibouti, Djibouti
Ancienneté présumée : entre 1950 et 1960
Aspect de surface : d'usage
Etat apparent : très bon état
Etat de conservation : dans son jus
Appartenance : collecte in situ
Hauteur, en cm : 18
Poids, en grammes : 213









 

Similar headrests have been published as representatives of Somali Styles 1A and 1B
in the book by Odilon Audouin,
APPUIE-NUQUE DE LA CORNE DE L'AFRIQUE Headrests from the Horn of Africa, Toguna, 2016  http://www.audouinheadrests.com/livre-corne-afrique 








 

A similar headrest in a collection http://africa.ubangi.collection.overblog.com/somali-/-ethiopie :

Appui téte de l'Ethnie Somali Ogaden, Ethiopie.
"Somali" fait référence a une langue parlée par un grand nombre de tribus disséminés de l'Ethiopie a la corne d'Afrique,en passant par djibouti, la Somalie et le Kenya.
Premiere moitié 20eme siècle.
Selon Lee Cassanelli les éléments caractéristiques des Somalis seraient la communauté linguistique avec des variations régionales, l’héritage islamique, un mode de vie pastoral et la revendication d’ancêtres communs.
L'appui nuque ou appui tête, appelé aussi support de rêve, a pour but d'éviter le contact direct de la tête sur le sol lors de la sieste ou la nuit pour préserver les coiffures élaborées qui demande quelque fois plusieurs années de travail et d'entretien. L'appui nuque est un objet personnel porté par les nomades et fait parti des objets patrimoniaux transmissibles de génération en génération.








 

South Sudan & Uganda & Kenya & Ethiopia

Didinga / Dinka / Lotuko / Toposa people of South Sudan?

Headrest / neckrest / appui nuque



  
Wood.
One piece of tree branches.
Nice shiny, silky patina, in particular on the upper part that forms the seat.
Nice reddish black color.
Zoomorphic form/shape.

Bought from the collection of traditional African art of Gy Mateusen in Oud Turnhout, Belgium, in 2015.

Not available.

This type of headrest made of 1 piece of wood with branches and is used in the region South Sudan & Uganda & Kenya & Ethiopia.
This particular type is often attributed to the Dinka people who live in South Sudan.
 

"As many peoples of eastern Africa make headrests/stools, it is difficult to attribute these objects to specific groups unless they have been collected in the field. Most are three-legged with one side flattened. Mack and Coote aptly describe the carving process as 'opportunistic', going on to say: 'The simple forms produced by the Dinka and Nuer are often little more than the result of judicious pruning of a found branch to produce a three- or four-legged stool or headrest. Zoomorphic features, such as a tail and a head, are sometimes "brought out". Among the Shilluk, Westermann noted that neckrests were used by men so that their hairstyles would not be spoilt during sleep. Many east African pastoralists regard coiffure primarily as an indicator of status. Among these groups a young man is entitled to begin wearing the distinctive coiffure that marks him as an adult only after he is initiated. As each member of the age set rises through the hierarchical society, changes in jewellery, hairstyle and feather decorations for the hair often mark each promotion. The use of headrests is often associated with this advancement and the headrests themselves become status svmbols. Whether this pattern is true for the Shilluk and Dinka is unknown, but it certainly seems likely as Shilluk men still wear elaborate coiffures, and among the Dinka headrests/stools are primarily used by older men (Jeremy Coote, personal communication). The Dinka multi-purpose headrests/stools also provide a convenient place to sit as it is not considered proper for elderly men to sit directly on the ground.
No special skills were associated with the construction of headrests by the Shilluk and any man could make them alongside such activities as
house-building and weapon-making. Headrests were made to resemble the forms of various animals, including ostriches and other birds. The symbolic importance of such objects is highlighted by the Shilluk belief that this headrest form was invented by Nyakang, their most important ancestor, culture hero and the founder of the Shilluk dynasty. The Anuak held that if the king-elect was able to balance on a three-legged stool during his investiture ceremony he was acknowledged as the rightful heir."
William Dewey - Africa The Art of a Continent








 

Similar headrests:


Accession Number: 1934.8.17
Country: Sudan Region: [Southern Sudan] ?Warab Fanamweir
Cultural Group: Dinka
Date Made: By 1933
Materials: Wood Plant
Process: Carved
Dimensions: Ht = 235; seat L = 446, W = 38, th = 36.3; leg diam = 16 to 24 mm [RTS 2/6/2005].
Weight: 452.5 g
Local Name: maniang
Other Owners: Collected by Percy Horace Gordon Powell-Cotton and his wife on 3rd May 1933 during a shooting expedition
Field Collector: Percy Horace Gordon Powell-Cotton & Hannah Powell-Cotton (nee Brayton)
PRM Source: Percy Horace Gordon Powell-Cotton
Acquired: Donated 1934
Collected Date: 3rd May 1933
Description: Headrest carved from a single piece of yellowish brown wood (Pantone 729C).
This is an example of 'found form', with a naturally grown branch specifically chosen because its shape, with subsidiary branches coming off the main stem to form the three feet, was suitable for making a headrest. It consists of a narrow horizontal seat across the top, tapering to either end. The back end is rounded, and the front extends as a longer tapering spur, possibly representing a stylised animal's neck. Both upper and lower surface of the seat are convex. Three narrower branches extend from the underside to form the legs. The front and back legs are in alignment, while the central leg splays out in the opposite direction. Each leg has a marked curve down its length, and has a worn bevelled surface on its underside. The bark has been stripped off the surface, and tool marks are visible throughout; it is not particularly well smoothed. The headrest is complete and intact, and has a weight of 452.5 grams. It is 235 mm high, with a seat that is 446 mm long, 38 mm wide and 36.3 mm thick; each leg has a diameter of from 16 to 24 mm.
Rachael Sparks 24/9/2005.
Primary Documentation: Accession Book Entry [p. 248] 1934 [insert] 8 [end insert] - MAJOR P. H. G. POWELL-COTTON , Quex Park, Birchington, E. Kent. Specimens collected by himself & Mrs Cotton, during hunting trips, 1933, viz: - From the DINKA tribe, FANAMWEIR & KORNUK, WHITE NILE [...] [insert] 17 [end insert] - Maniang , head-rest with three-legs, cut from a natural tree branch. FANAMWEIR (2161).
Card Catalogue Entry - There is no further information on the catalogue card [RTS 03/03/2004].
Pitt Rivers Museum label - AFRICA, Sudan, Fanamweir. Dinka tribe. Wooden headrest, maniang . No. 2161. Coll. P.H.G. Powell-Cotton, 1934.8.17 [plastic coated label, tied to object; RTS 2/6/2005].
Written on object - Head-rest, maniang . DINKA, FANAMWEIR, WHITE NILE. 8° 53' N., 28° 42' E. d.d. Major Powell-Cotton. 1934 [RTS 2/6/2005].
Related Documents File - Typewritten List of "Curios Presented to Dr. Balfour by Major & Mrs. Powell-Cotton. Dinka Tribe". This object appears as item 2161: "Pillow root, 3 legs; native name Maniang , 3/5/33 Fanamweir, 8.55 N, 28.42 E". Also contains details of a cine film 'some tribes of the Southern Sudan', taken by Powell-Cotton during this 1933 expedition, copies of which are now in the National Film and Television Archive and the Powell-Cotton Museum in Kent [RTS 14/3/2005].










 


Accession Number: 1979.20.88
Country: Sudan
Region: [Southern Sudan] Northern Bahr el Ghazal ?Dhangrial ?Wun Rog ?Mayen
Cultural Group: Dinka Tuich
Date Made: By 1979
Materials: Wood Plant
Process: Carved , Polished
Dimensions: L = 585, Ht = 250, seat W = 56, th = 53, central leg W = 30.5, th = 29 mm [RTS 22/3/2005].
Weight: >1000g
Other Owners: Purchased by Patti Langton for �2, probably on 20th February 1979 as part of the British Institute in Eastern Africa's Expedition to the Southern Sudan [RTS 14/5/2004].
Field Collector: Patti Langton
PRM Source: Patti Langton
Acquired: Purchased 1979
Collected Date: 20 February 1979?
Description: Headrest carved from a single piece of yellowish brown wood (Pantone 7509C). This is an example of 'found form', where a naturally occurring tree branch with subsidiary limbs coming off the main body to form feet has been chosen because its shape was particularly suited to the intended use. This was shaped by trimming off excess foliage, removing the outer bark covering, cutting the legs to the same height and carving either end of the seat for decorative effect. The result is a stylised form, usually designed to imitate an animal, but in this instance apparently anthropomorphic. This consists of a horizontal seat that tapers to either end. The front end of this has been carved to form a triangular head, cut flat across the top and with 3 short horizontal cuts running across the front that seem to form the features of a human face when seen in profile (nose, lips and chin?). Behind this, the branch gradually widens, forming a long neck, with a raised rectangular bar across its base that forms a frame for the edge of the seat area. This is rectangular, and although it has been largely cut flat across its upper surface it maintains a very slight convex curve across its width, and concave curve across its length. There is a slight raised knob on the other end of this, then the branch becomes round in section again before ending in a rectangular knob, mirroring the dimensions of the carved head opposite but lacking any further carved features. The underside of the seat retains the curve of the parent branch. Three legs extend from this area, one each at front and back, both angled out on the same side, and a third leg splaying out in the opposite direction from closer to the centre. They have all been cut along their bases, but irregularly, so that they tend to rest on the inside face of the foot in each case. The centre foot in particular shows strong wear on its underside, indicating the headrest has been used. The surface of the wood still shows numerous shaving and cut marks, but has also been polished. The headrest is complete, with some flaws and knots in the wood, and the wood has begun to split along the seat, and up the legs from their bases. It is quite heavy, weighing over 1000 grams, with a total length of 585 mm. It has a maximum height of 250 mm; the seat is 56 mm wide and 53 mm thick, while the central leg has a diameter of 30.5 by 29 mm.
Purchased by Patti Langton on 20th February 1979 for £2, as part of the British Institute in East Africa's expedition to the southern Sudan. The place of collection was not specified, but would have been either Dhangrial, Wun Rog or Mayen, all of which like in the modern administrative district of Northern Bahr el Ghazal. For a map showing the distribution of Dinka Tuich groups, see J. Ryle, 1982, Warriors of the White Nile: The Dinka , p. 25.
This headrest has some similarities with 1979.20.86, although the latter is more sturdy. That example was used by men as a headrest and seat, and for sleeping on by old women.
Rachael Sparks 25/9/2005.









 


Accession Number: 1966.1.1176
Country: Sudan?
Cultural Group: Nuer? Dinka?
Date Made: By 1966
Materials: Wood Plant Process: Carved , Stained , Polished Dimensions: Ht = 232, seat L = 555, seat W = 23.5, seat th = 25.5, feet diam = 15.8 to 18 mm [RTS 25/7/2005]. Weight: 348.0 g Local Name: k�m? Other Owners: This object was collected by Frederick John Jackson, and became part of the 'Batley Loan Collection', probably the former Bagshaw Museum in Bately; it was subsequently transferred to the Ipswich Museum, and then purchased by the Pitt Rivers Museum in 1966 Field Collector: Frederick John Jackson PRM Source: Ipswich Museum per Patricia M. Butler Acquired: Purchased 1966 Collected Date: By 1966 Description: Headrest carved from a single piece of wood, stained a darker brown colour (Pantone Black 4C). This is an example of 'found form', with a naturally grown branch specifically chosen because its shape, with subsidiary branches coming off the main stem to form the three feet, was suitable for making a headrest. It consists of a narrow horizontal seat across the top that undulates slightly along its length, and has a convex upper surface. It tapers to a point at one end, which may represent a stylised head of an animal, with a longer tapering 'tail' at the opposite end. Three shorter branches extend from the underside to form the legs, with 2 legs at the front end, splaying out in opposite directions, and the third leg extending down from the back; all three legs are comparatively straight. The feet have been flattened and show signs of wear. The headrest is complete, but has a small split running up from one foot. It has a weight of 348 grams and is 232 mm high; the seat is 555 mm long, 23.5 mm wide and 25.5 mm thick, while the feet have a diameter of from 15.8 to 18 mm.

This object was collected by Frederick John Jackson, and became part of the 'Batley Loan Collection', probably the former Bagshaw Museum in Bately; it was subsequently transferred to the Ipswich Museum, and then purchased by the Pitt Rivers Museum in 1966.

The accession book entry suggested a possible Teso origin for this object, based on an illustration in M. Trowell and K.P. Wachsmann, 1953, The Tribal Crafts of Uganda, Pl. 36D. However the object illustrated, which is actually a stool, has a much wider, flat-cut seat, and is not a good parallel; a more likely origin is amongst the Nuer, or possibly Dinka of the Southern Sudan, who typically make use of slender headrests of this type. For similar pieces in the collection, see 1917.25.39-40, 1931.66.17-18, 1932.30.1, 1936.10.56, 1937.34.49, 1948.2.128 (all Nuer), 1934.8.17 (Dinka) and 1936.10.55 (Anuak). Evans-Pritchard identifies a similar headrest made from a naturally forked branch as a köm (see 1937.34.49), although he also uses this term for Anuak examples (see 1936.10.55-6).

Objects like these were used by men to protect their elaborate hairstyles. Willis described the Nuer practice of covering their hair with a paste made of clay, cow dung and urine, and then shaping it into the desired style, such as a cock's comb, or a peak at front or back. This treatment gradually wears off, staining the hair a reddish colour, and then the hair needs to be redone. Domville-Fife describes a similar process for the Shilluk in some detail, although amongst that group hair is dressed by a specialist barber, and is a costly process (C.W. Domville Fife, 1927, Savage Life in the Black Sudan, pp 71-76).

Rachael Sparks 22/08/2005.









 


Source: Staatliche Museen zu Berlin








 


# W252
Nackenstütze Äthiopien Holz H. 13 cm / L. 23 cm
(380) Euro 180
Provenienz: André Kirbach, Privatsammlung







 


HEAD REST Sudan DINK 777
WOOD . Fibre
L : 15 and half in ( 39.5 cm )
Dinka . Sudan
Price: 125.00 USD








 


DINKA HEADREST
Origin: Dinka, Sudan
Material: Wood, leather, brass
Height: 16cm
Provenance: Expatriate American Collection ID Number: JK1004
SOLD
Considering the inhospitably of Sudan then and now, the Dinka tribe have brought such beauty to the world with their African art. This headrest was created with the resources available in Sudan, including the decorative bullet shells ingrained into the wood. The delicately worn carving is complemented by original leather strap still inserted, conveying considerable use and care within the tribal context.








 


DINKA HEADREST 5, SUDAN
20" l x 9" h
SOLD
In many African cultures, carved wooden "pillows" are used to support the head during sleep and in some instances to preserve a hairstyle. The wonderful angular forms of the Dinka headrests sometimes incorporate a handle into the overall design to facilitate carrying.
http://www.hamillgallery.com/index.html









 


DINKA HEADREST 6, SUDAN
13.25" long x 7" high
$300
This headrest has been vetted as authentic, with signs of age and use.
In many African cultures, carved wooden "pillows" are used to support the head during sleep and in some instances to preserve a hairstyle. The wonderful angular forms of the Dinka headrests sometimes incorporate a handle into the overall design to facilitate carrying.
http://www.hamillgallery.com/index.html









Similar headrests have been attributed to the Shiluk and Dinka peoples in Sudan
in the book by Pierre Loos, Thomas Bayet et Sophie Caltaux
La tête dans les étoiles: Appuie-nuques du monde
Brussels : BRUNEAF
2012
168 pp.
exhibition catalog
du 6 au 10 juin 2012
Les caves de la nonciature
7 Rue des Sablons - Place du Grand Sablon
1000 - Brussels
Belgium









 

A few similar headrest have been published as Didinga / Dinka / Lotuko / Toposa from South Sudan, in the book
Eduardo Lopez Moreno
Wooden Dreams: East African Headrests
Milano
5 Continents Editions
2015
25x287x249 mm
1,77 kg
268 color illustrations
Format: Hardcover
ISBN10 8874397062
ISBN13 9788874397068









 


Headrest : Hamar Region of south Omo basin: Ethiopia. Wood, leather.
ex-David Serra, Spain








 


Specifications: Dinka Head Rest
Origin: South Sudan.
34 x 6 x 18 cm
Provenance: Arthur Rudner Collection, Cape Town (1950's) then Michel Fachau 'Profiles of Africa Collection, Cape Town then Private Collection, Melbourne.
for sale 550$
The Dinka are a pastoral-agricultural people that make up the largest ethnic group in South Sudan They vary their lifestyle by season – in the rainy season they live in permanent savannah settlements and raise grain crops like millet, while in the dry season they herd cattle along rivers throughout their region. Their lives are very closely intertwined with those of their cattle – at their coming of age ceremony, young Dinka men are given an ox, and that ox’s name becomes a part of their own name. As it grows, they also shape their ox’s long horns into different forms.
http://africanorigins.com.au/domestic-objects/ in 2017









 


Dinka headrest sold by Christas in Denmark.
http://christas.dk
Headrests are used as pillows to help someone to have good sleep. They are also used as a comfort to help protect ceremonial coiffure. In some occasions headrests are used as stool. As a personal object, the headrest has become part of the individual. Usually, when the person died, he is buried with his headrest. Sometimes the headrest is passed on to his heir, who would treat it with respect because this wooden piece embodies the spirit of the deceased person.
The Dinka are a herder Nilotic group which is a group of peoples from the Nile Basin speaking Nilo-Saharan languages, which are part of the northwestern Congo, Western Ethiopia, Southern Uganda and Kenya, northern Tanzania, and southern Sudan. These groups move according to the seasons from place to place in the search of water and gazing land for good pasturage. The Dinka inhabit the vast savanna of southern Sudan in Africa. Although the Dinka are the largest ethnic group in Sudan, their historical background remains obscure. As far as we know, the Dinka settled in the area around 1800 and often have been often in conflict with their neighboring peoples, such as the Atuot. Their reputation as redoubtable warriors comes from their successfully defense against the Ottoman centuries ago. Being a Valiant warrior is an important value the Dinka transmits to the youth. This value is taught through the initiation of young boys. At the end of the initiation, the boys are presented with a spear, a club and a shield, the equipment of a warrior. The lifestyle of the Dinka is that of the nomad and herders. Today Dinka people raise cattle and practice agriculture. Little is known about their art. However, Dinka personal and body adornments are among the most astonishing on the all continent. The Dinka nomadic lifestyle is reflected in their art. In fact, the Dinka have excelled in the production of small objects, easy to carry. Stools and headrests are among these precious objects. Dinka headrests, also used as a stool or neck rest, are carved from a single piece of yellowish brown wood and consist of three to four-legged stable seats, carved separately from one another. In most of the cases they are made from one piece. The seats have various forms and usually narrow curved with rounded corners, slightly concave along its length and convex across its width, with a convex underside. Some have zoomorphic motifs which include birds, antelope, and giraffe. These stools and headrests are known as thoch (stool), and used as a headrest and seat by both old men and women. They are also used to protect elaborate coiffure. In the Dinka society and neighboring peoples, headrests like this are very personal. They are believed to house the soul of the owner. In some sources, similar stools or headrests have been attributed to the Bongo people living in the Dinka and Bari neighborhood.









 


http://knaicollection.com/1/viewlarge.asp?item=655&webtype=2
Dinka Headrest Dinka, Sudan Wood #888
The Dinka live in the south-eastern marshlands of the Sudan. They are nomadic herders and live primarily of fishing and cattle. This headrest called "Magere" by the locals, has been made from a branch that has been pruned into a shape suggesting that of an animal.








 


Headrest - Dinka People - Sudan (4819) Headrest
Price: $195.00
Headrest carved from a single piece of wood. This is an example of 'found form', with a naturally grown branch specifically chosen because its shape, with subsidiary branches coming off the main stem to form the three feet, was suitable for making a headrest.
1.5"H x 8.5"W x 7"D
http://www.africaandbeyond.com/index.html








 

http://www.africanheadrests.com/bor.htm:









 

http://tribalgatheringlondon.com/gallery/page/3/ in 2017:

Zoomorphic in form.L – 28 cm.
Great movement,like a lizard on the move. Southern Sudanese.
£380









 


Uganda & Kenya & Ethiopia & South Sudan

Dasaneth/Dasanech, Kaara, Karamajong/Karamoja/Karomojong, Mursi, Nyangatom, Turkana

Headrest / neckrest


Low-density wood with a handle in aluminum.

Attractive saddle shape / form.
Nice decorations on the upper part.

Bought personally from Lalibela Gallery, in Addis Ababa, capital city of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

This type is attributed in several publications to a few peoples living in East Africa, in the border region of the countries Uganda & Kenya & Ethiopia & South Sudan; these include the Dasaneth/Dasanech, Kaara, Karamajong/Karamoja/Karomojong, Mursi, Nyangatom, Turkana...

Not available.









 

Similar headrest:


A well used portable headrest with a wonderful worn patina to the wood and lovely proportions with original brass handle.
6.25"W x 7"H
For sale for 695$ from the Hot Moon Collection in USA, attributed to the Dinka people who live in South Sudan.








 


A headrest attributed to the Turkana people, for sale from Fagan-arms, for 650 $.








A few similar headrests have been published and attributed to Daasanech / Karamajong / Turkana peoples, in the book
Eduardo Lopez Moreno
Wooden Dreams: East African Headrests
Milano
5 Continents Editions
2015
25x287x249 mm
1,77 kg
268 color illustrations
Format: Hardcover
ISBN10 8874397062
ISBN13 9788874397068









 


More pieces have not been photographed and put in this WWW page, due to a lack of time:
headrests from Ethiopia, South Sudan, Somalia, Angola, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania...

This document was updated most recently 2017-06


Feel free to contact me for additional information and appraisals: pnieuwen@vub.ac.be


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