Spoons / scoops / spatulas, in the collection of antique, classical, ethnic, ethnographic, ethno-tribal, native, ritual, traditional, tribal, so-called "primitive" art from Sub-Saharan black Africa

Clicking on a small photo brings you a bigger photo.

The attributions of the origin of the objects is based on their stylistic characteristics and/or on the data provided by the seller and/or experts, but of course certainty cannot be reached.

In the following, the objects have been arranged according to their probable origin.

 


Angola & Democratic republic Congo = DRC = ex-Zaire, & Zambia, in Central Africa

Luena = Lwena people

Spatula / Cooking stick / Spatule cephalomorphe de cuisine


Light colored wood with nice patina.
Bought in 2016-09 from a collector of African tribal art in Antwerpen, Belgium.
Ex old Belgian collection.
Probably from the region Angola / DRC, where such spatula's are made and used by peoples such as Chokwe/Tchokwe, Luena/Lwena, Lunda.
On the old label under the stand we read the name Lwena/Luena, which is indeed a people living in that region.
On a black, heavy metal stand.
With clear traces of usage.

Not available.









 

Lunda = Balunda people

Spatula / Cooking stick / Spatule cephalomorphe de cuisine


Dark colored wood with nice patina.

Probably from the region Angola / DRC, where such spatulas are made and used by peoples such as Chokwe/Tchokwe, Luena/Lwena, Lunda/Balunda.
On the old label under the stand we read the name Lunda, which is indeed a people living in that region.
On a black, heavy metal stand.
With clear traces of usage.

Bought in 2016-09 from a collector of African tribal art in Antwerpen, Belgium.
previously in old Belgian collection.

Not available.

Similar objects:
 


Offered for sale by a dealer in 2016.









 


http://www.randtribal.com offers this object for sale in 2016:
Chokwe spatula/cooking stick, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Angola 18" tall wood, pigment mid 20th century, definite signs of age and use ex private collection, US.
$850
This finely carved example features the head of a female ancestor with a patterned coiffure and is adorned by elaborate patterns on the handle. Cooking sticks are carved by men and generally used by women. Highly decorated examples like this were usually made for a chief's wife or cook.









 


A lot offered for sale at auction in USA, including one wooden spatula.









 


Museum object.







 


http://ericbossard.hebfree.org/collection/index.html








 

Congo = DRC, formerly Zaire

Lega=Balega=Warega people from eastern DRC?

http://www.barakatgallery.com /store/index.cfm/FuseAction/ItemDetails/cmdNextItem/21961/ItemID/21961/SubCatID/181/userid/ItemID/PurchaseForm/1.htm :

The Lega people are amongst Africa’s best-known carvers and artists. Currently settled in the Kivu province of the eastern DRC, they believe themselves to be descended from an eponymous ancestor who migrated into the area from what is now Uganda. They are also known as Warega and Balega, based on corruptions of their actual name by neighbouring groups and Arab traders, respectively. They live in small villages and consider themselves parts of distinct lineages, although to outsiders the “Lega” group is a well-defined unit. They are further defined on the basis of their modes of subsistence. The western Lega settled in the forest (malinga), where they rely on hunting and gathering, while the eastern groups live on poor soils, further denuded by their mode of slash-and-burn agriculture.

Lega government is based along the lines of a gerontocracy; and balanced very finely between leading members of different lineages. The Lega believe in a trio of gods named Kinkunga, Kalaga and Kakinga, and that when humans die they will enter a subterranean afterworld known as Uchimu. Social life is structured by three main social institutions: family and kinship (ibuta), circumcision rituals (ibuta) and the Bwami society. Of these, the latter is perhaps the most powerful. It is centred upon the guidance of young people to moral maturity, although it also fulfils a range of other political socio-political, economic and artistic functions. Much of the paraphernalia produced by the Lega pertains to the workings of the Bwami society. Examples include initiation objects – that are sometimes ground away and the resulting dust used as a healing device – isengo (lit. “heavy things” used in healing), binumbi (publicly visible insignia), bingonzengonze (“things of play”) and the large category of sculpted objects/assemblages known as bitungwa. Within the latter there are numerous sub-categories along the lines of size, material, ownership and type. This applies to all manner of objects, especially kalimbangoma and iginga figures. All members of the Bwami own one of these, which is usually cared for, oiled and kept by their wife. The higher the rank, the more impressive the figure. The members of Yananio and the lowest level of kindi own kalmibangoma figures, while the elite members of Kindi and the highest-ranking woman may own iginga (pl. maginga) pieces, which are the most coveted of all initiation pieces.

In general terms, Lega figures are used by members of the Bwami society, who commission the figure with a general description of how it should look (pose, material etc) but who leave the details to the carver. All figures tend to represent aspects of the ideal Lega male – a large forehead, a shaved head (sometimes with a cap) and a straight posture – and are endowed with the characteristics of a Bwami initiate: washed, shining and proud.

 

http://artworld.uea.ac.uk/world-art-studies/africa/cultural-groups-country/lega:

The Lega live in forested country in eastern Zaire. They practise a diversity of craft; carving in wood, bone and especially ivory, pottery, basketry, blacksmithing and the preparation of cosmetic oil and powders. They make a traditional coinage from shells, used particularly for initiation and marriage customs.

The Lega believe in a trinity of deities; two who stand for what is good and creative and one who represents evil and sorcery. Ancestors are the intercessors who can activate the powers for good. Sorcerers and witches activate the power of evil. Divination, always a male technique, locates the source of evil. All women, but few men, are regarded as potential sorcerers.

The Lega have no centralised state or hereditary chief, but each village has its headman. Everyone belongs to an extended patriarchal family, a particular lineage and a clan. The Bwami society, to which both men and women may belong, provides the strength of community and kinship against the forces of evil. Bwami permeates every aspect of Lega activity. It has a hierarchy and grades of membership and rules which also govern all Lega society.

Art works, in conjunction with ritual objects made from animal and forest products, are used in the initiation rites of various Bwami grades. They include masks and maskettes, figures in human and animal form, spoon-shaped objects, miniature knives, sceptres and stools, many of them carved in ivory and bone. They may be insignia of rank or may illustrate virtues and failings and the principles of correct conduct. Many are combined with proverbs and used in songs and dances to illustrate behaviour codes.

It would be misleading to generalise on Lega art style. Faces are usually slightly concave and often egg-shaped or even triangular. Forms are often geometric and linear. Much use is made of tukola (camwood powder) to give a dark red patina to both wood and ivory.
Lega art is very commonly faked.

John Heron Dickson | Dec 1997

Further reading:

Biebuyk, D. 1973. Lega Culture. Berkeley

 

Spoon shaped object (Lega?)

Bought from the son of an administrator who worked in Africa around 1960; spoon from East Congo=DRC, formerly Zaire.

The Lega people live in East Congo and they make ritual spoons of this type.

Viviane Baeke Africa Museum, Tervuren
A la recherche du sens du bwami: Au fil d’une collection lega pas comme les autres...
http://www.anthroposys.be/vbaekelegabwami.pdf

Les cuillers en ivoire, lukili ou kalukili , ne sont habituellement pas utilisées dans la vie quotidienne, sauf parfois par les vieilles personnes. Au sein du bwami , les cuillers sont au centre de deux séquences rituelles ; l’une, appelée nkunda , fait partie de la série des rites d’initiation au grade yananio : deux initiateurs masqués se placent mutuellement une cuiller dans la bouche, scène qui symbolise l’administration du poison d’ordalie, et plus précisément le geste qui consiste à demander que l’on administre le contrepoison, lorsqu’une personne reconnue coupable se voyait sauvée par un neveu utérin. (Biebuyck 1983 : 58). L’autre séquence rituelle, l’étape ultime de l’accession au grade kindi , est appelée « dépouiller l’éléphant de sa peau » ; le toit de la case d’initiation symbolise le dos de l’animal ; divers initiés, ainsi que le futur kindi , « tuent l’éléphant » en défonçant le toit à l’aide de lames et de cuillers en ivoire, assimilées à des couteaux, tout en clamant leurs noms. Cette séquence étrange exprime, selon Biebuyck, la fierté que doit ressentir le nouvel initié, mais l’exhorte aussi à exercer son autorité nouvellement acquise. (idem : 56).
Patinées avec soin, les cuillers connotent en général « la pérennité, la continuité [...] l’objet d’initiation en général, qui n’appartient à personne en particulier mais passe de main en main, de génération en génération, une chose qui ne doit être ni perdue, ni détruite » (idem : 54- 55). Les cuillers peuvent revêtir des formes abstraites ou anthropomorphes, plus ou moins stylisées (ill. 33 à 36). Le personnage inséré entre les deux cuillerons de l’exemplaire de Tervuren (ill. 37) rappelle singulièrement les caractéristiques formelles des pendentifs illustrés à la p. 2 et 27-28 (ill.1 et ill. 40-41)








 

http://www.philippelaeremans.be/objetsdumoisartafricain/ in 2017:
Les cuillères en ivoire, lukili ou kalukili, ne sont habituellement pas utilisées dans la vie quotidienne, sauf parfois par les vieilles personnes. Au sein du bwami, les cuillères sont au centre de deux séquences rituelles; l’une, appelée nkunda, fait partie de la série des rites d’initiation au grade yananio : deux initiateurs masqués se placent mutuellement une cuillère dans la bouche, scène qui symbolise l’administration du poison d’ordalie, et plus précisément le geste qui consiste à demander que l’on administre le contrepoison, lorsqu’une personne reconnue coupable se voyait sauvée par un neveu utérin. L’autre séquence rituelle, l’étape ultime de l’accession au grade kindi, est appelée « dépouiller l’éléphant de sa peau » ; le toit de la case d’initiation symbolise le dos de l’animal; divers initiés, ainsi que le futur kindi, «tuent l’éléphant» en défonçant le toit à l’aide de lames et de cuillères en ivoire, assimilées à des couteaux, tout en clamant leurs noms. Cette séquence étrange exprime la fierté que doit ressentir le nouvel initié, mais l’exhorte aussi à exercer son autorité nouvellement acquise.
Patinées avec soin, les cuillères connotent en général « la pérennité, la continuité […] l’objet d’initiation en général, qui n’appartient à personne en particulier mais passe de main en main, de génération en génération, une chose qui ne doit être ni perdue, ni détruite ». Les cuillères peuvent revêtir des formes abstraites ou anthropomorphes, plus ou moins stylisées.
Tous les masingo, figurines, masques, cuillères, autres objets et assemblages d’éléments naturels, servaient essentiellement de supports didactiques au cours des danses, chants, proverbes et aphorismes qui transmettaient le code de conduite idéal aux nouveaux initiés, prônaient la cohésion du groupe ainsi que la paix, la sagesse, la prudence, la fidélité dans le mariage et la modération en toutes circonstances. L’aspiration des hommes à entrer au sein du bwami, les défauts qui en interdisent l’accès et les compétences nécessaires pour monter en grade, en sont également des thèmes récurrents.









 


Ethiopia


 

South Ethiopia

Spoon made of animal horn, old


Bought in Ethiopia in the 1990's by a French collector.
High quality; in good shape, intact; great patina.
Difficult to find now in Ethiopia.

On a professionally made heavy, black, iron stand.

Sold, not in collection anymore.








 

Spoon made of animal horn, old


Very dark in comparison with similar spoons.
In good shape, intact.
Bought in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

On a heavy, professionally made, black, iron stand.

Not available anymore; not in collection anymore.






 

Spoon made of animal horn


Made like the well-known old and used spoons.
Nice shape and material.

Can be used as a tool or as decoration.








Similar objects:

Similar spoons have been published and are named "mooka" in the book
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars-septembre 1996.
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
abondamment illustré en n/b
broché
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen:
--Introduction
--Groupes culturels
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Le catalogue le plus complet sur les objets d'Ethiopie.
Poids = 700 g








 

"These elegant carved spoons made out of a horn of goat or sheep with a large bowl and a handle sometimes ornamented with incised or engravings motifs come from Ethiopia. These spoons show the ability of Ethiopian artists to work with various materials and produce variety of artworks and utilitarian objects such as these spoons. These spoons were probably used in special ceremonies."
(Africa Direct Inc., 2006)








 

Vente aux enchères du Samedi 17 novembre 2012

Art Africain & Océanien

Arts Premiers

Salle des ventes de Chinon - Chinon

Lot 269 : Lot de quatre anciennes cuillères en corne

Lot de quatre anciennes cuillères en corne - Auction

Estimation : 100 / 150 €

Lot de quatre anciennes cuillères en corne à patine d'usage, Ethiopie

En moyenne : 26 cm












Spoon horn Sidamo
"Sidamo is people living in the southwest of Ethiopia, in the region of nations, nationalities and people of the South. its capital was at first Yrgalem during centuries, then Awasa before its fastening with the region Oromia. Large number of sidamos lives on farming and mainly on the production of coffee."
(Antiqueafrique)









10/12/11
auction
Goxe-Belaïsch
EMail : contact@enghien-svv.com Tél. : 01 34 12 68 16
Estimation : 100 - 150 €
Lot n°258
Sidamo Ethiopie. Deux cuiller en cornes sculptées.









 
CUILLERE SPOON HORN CORNE ETHIOPIE SIDAMO
sold in 2010 for 50 Euro
ChezTamTam, Jean PORCHEZ 13 rue andre del sarte, 75018 Paris, Île-de-France, France









Was available for sale for 85 Euro from Mignot, France

Was available for sale for 85 Euro from Mignot, France
Cuillere Jimma en corne - Oromo - Ethiopie

Le repas traditionnel se faisant avec les doigts (main droite), ces cuillères très souvent ornées ont une tout autre fonction que de servir à préparer le repas, ou bien à le consommer.

En corne animale, il n'est pas rare que le manche soit orné de motifs géométriques, plus ou moins fins et nombreux.

·  Ethnie : Oromo / Oroma

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Pays d'origine : Érythrée

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Zone de collecte : Érythrée, Asmara

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Ancienneté présumée : entre 1960 et 1970

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Matière principale : corne animale

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Aspect de surface : d'usage

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Etat apparent : très bon état

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Etat de conservation : dans son jus

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Appartenance : collecte in situ

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Test laboratoire : non testé

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Hauteur, en cm : 26

·  http://cdnb.bruno-mignot.com/galeries/themes/bm01/img/icon/hpblock_puce.png   Poids, en grammes : 85
www.bruno-mignot.com









Bonhams
20 Nov 2012 13:00 EST New York, African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art
Spoon, Ethiopia
length 15 3/4in (40cm)
Horn
Provenance: Marc & Denyse Ginzberg, New York
Sold for US$ 687 inc. premium









 


Ethiopia & Somalia

Somali or Afar/Afaar or Boni people

Spoon


Wood; patina.

Bought in Addis Ababa, capital city of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Similar spoons are attributed to the Afar or Somali or Boni people in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya.

Not available; sold; ex-collection.







 

Spoon


Wood; patina.

Bought in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Similar spoons are attributed to the Afar or Somali or Boni people in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya.

Not available for sale.







 

Spoon


Wood; patina.

Bought in Addis Ababa in 2015-03.

Similar spoons are attributed to the Afar or Somali or Boni people in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya.

Not available.







 

Similar spoons:

This type of spoon is often named "Boni spoon", but the Boni form only a very small people; it is more likely that they were made also by the Somali and even the Afar people.

Photos of similar spoons have been published and the spoons have been attributed to the Somali people, in the book
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars- septembre 1996.
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
abondamment illustré en n/b
broché
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen:
--Introduction
--Groupes culturels
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Le catalogue le plus complet sur les objets d'Ethiopie.
Poids = 700 g








 

http://www.karlssonandwickman.com/ :


Boni spoon, Kenya/Somalia
Very nice spoon from the Boni people with fine shiny patina.
22 cm, 8,7 in
600 €








 

http://www.bruno-mignot.com/ :

Cuillere en bois - Ethnie Somali - Somalie - Afrique de l'Est
125 Euro









 


Ethiopia & Somalia & Eritrea & Djibouti

Afar / Afaar or Somali or Borana or Oromo people

Long spoon


Wood with nice patina.

Bought from the big Zebra gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available for sale.










 

Long spoon


Wood with nice carvings and patina.

Bought from Lucy gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available for sale.









 

Long spoon


Wood with very nice carvings and patina.

Bought from a gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

Not available for sale.









 

Similar spoons have been published in the book
AETHIOPIA, Objets d'Ethiopie: Catalogue de l'exposition "Aethiopia, Peuples d'Ethiopie" Mars- septembre 1996.
Musée Royal de l"Afrique Centrale Tervuren, Belgique/Belgium, Vol. 151
1996
142 pages
30 x 21 cm
ISBN 10: 9075894392
ISBN 13: 9789075894394
abondamment illustré en n/b
broché
textes par Xavier Van de Stappen:
--Introduction
--Groupes culturels
421 photos d'objets ethniques, avec description et provenance (ethnie, lieu de récolte) précises :  manuscrits, Icone-polyptyque, croix en argent, appuie-nuque, récipients divers, céramiques, sièges, boucliers, plateaux, trépieds, labrets,  paniers, bracelets et autres objets de décoration personnelle etc...
Le catalogue le plus complet sur les objets d'Ethiopie.
Poids = 700 g

There we read that these spoons are named "ourbin" and are attributed to the Somali people.







 

A similar spoon has been offered for sale for 96 Euro:

Cuillere en bois - Borana - Ethiopie

En savoir plus sur Cuillere en bois - Borana - Ethiopie - Objet n°3009 - Galerie Bruno Mignot sur www.bruno-mignot.com







 

Small spoon


Wood with nice smooth, silky patina.

Bought from the big Zebra Gallery in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, in 2015-03.

The origin is not (yet) clear.

Not available for sale.









 


Ghana in West Africa

More specific origin not known

Spoon / pounder / pestle / cuiller-pilon, so-called Kulango spoon


Medium-density wood. Patina, not shiny.
Probably well used and not cleaned drastically.

Bought from a collection of traditional art from West Africa in Germany in 2010.

Available: 120 Euro.

These spoons are famous for their great anthropomorphic design.
They are often called Kulango spoons, but their origin is not specifically the Kulango people; instead their origin is Ghana, as Amyas Naegele, expert and dealer in traditional art, told me when I visited him in his office in New York, USA.

http://brunoclaessens.com :
These spoons have always been one of my favourite household items from Africa. Their design surpasses the purely utilitarian character of many other examples. Presented on a pedestal, it is a wonderful form. In 1988, Jacques Kerchache, was the second to publish such a spoon in his magnus opus L’Art Africain (p. 377, n° 336). Among the hundreds of objects illustrated in this book only one is purely non-figurative: a single voluptuous spoon identified as Kulango. Gérard Berjonneau and Jean-Louis Sonnery had published it one year before in their book Rediscovered Masterpieces of African Art (1987, p. 270, no.273). In 2010, this particular spoon was sold by Sotheby’s for € 78.750,- (info, see above). A similar spoon, again identified as Kulango, fetched thirteen thousand euro in the famous Goldet auction of 2001 (lot 223). It was also published by Christiane Falgayrettes in the exhibition catalogue Cuillers-Sculptures (Paris: Editions Dapper, 1991: p. 68). Not suprisingly, these spoons have become very popular ever since and in recent years it became fairly easy to find examples in the trade (often at very fluctuating prices). More than a dozen got published, always identified as Kulango.
BUT, they might not even be from Ivory Coast ! It was thanks to the NY dealer Amyas Naegele I just learned that these spoons might in fact be from the Ashanti. In a Facebook photo album (here, see one example below), he showed a group of essentially identical spoons, all labeled as Ashanti. He writes:
Except for the small, slender example which pre-date them, they were all collected in central Ghanaian villages between 1990-2006 by friends. Each example is well used and varies subtly from the next in age, wear and form. They are used in the kitchen.
Amyas Naegele informed me that Michelle Gilbert, an art history professor at Trinity College in Connecticut, has been doing field research in Akwapim, an Ashanti town, for decades. She bought several examples locally and insisted they were Ashanti. Additional, multiple trustworthy Ghanaian art dealers brought many of these spoons to the US and always described them as Ashanti !
So, in all likelihood, Berjonneau, Sonnery, Paudrat or Kerchache were probably mislead and their misidentification has echoed ever since. As Amyas Naegele correctly states (personal communication, 08-10-13):
It is possible that the Kulango also made such spoons but the form shows relatively little variation – certainly not the kind of variation one would expect over an area ranging from Akwapim to Kulango country. The falsehood about the origin of these spoons spread against a background where there was no information and no expertise and certainly no contradicting information. Unfortunately this kind of thing is extremely common in our field.














Similar objects:
 


Christie's auctions
Price Realized ($5,299) Price includes buyer's premium
Sale 2454 TRIBAL ART 24 May 2000 Amsterdam
Lot Description A fine Kulango pestle/spoon The spoon with almost spherical bowl, the pounder of short flared form, curved handle between, dark glossy patina
28cm. long
Literature
Schädler, K.-F., Gods Spirits and Ancestors, Munich, 1994, p.11
Schädler, K.-F., Lexikon Afrikanische Kunst und Kultur, Munich, 1994, p.240
Schädler, K.-F., Afrikanische Kunst, 1997, p.103 Exhibited Vienna, 1997, Earth and Ore. 2500 Years of African Art in Terracotta and Metal Lot Notes Cf. another almost identical, Kerchache, J., Paudrat, J.-L., and Stéphan, L., Art of Africa, 1989, p.377, fig.336 ENLARGE









 


Sothebys auction
Art Africain et Océanien, African and Oceanic Sale
106
très belle cuiller et pilon, Kulango, République de Côte d’Ivoire
A VERY NICE KULANGO SPOON AND PESTEL, IVORY COAST
Estimate: 1,400 — 2,300 EUR
LOT SOLD. 1,440 EUR (Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium)
05 December 2003 | 2:30 PM CET
Paris
Objet d’une belle ordonnance géométrique : jouant sur une lecture en trois dimensions, le manche oblique fait glisser le regard en profondeur jusqu’à l’intérieur du cuilleron. La base conique, sculptée en décroché par rapport à l’axe du manche, sert de pilon.
haut. 29 cm









 


Sotheby's auction
African and Oceanic Arts, various owners
2007
36
Cuiller-pilon, Kulango, Côte d'Ivoire
A KULANGO SPOON, CÔTE D'IVOIRE
Estimate
2,000 — 3,000
unsold







 


The Marc and Denyse Ginzberg Collection, African Forms Sale: PF7027
Location: Paris
Auction Dates: Session 1: Mon, 10 Sep 07 5:00 PM
LOT 152
f - CUILLER-PILON, KULANGO, CÔTE D'IVOIRE [A KULANGO SPOON-PESTLE, IVORY COAST]
Lot Sold. Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium: 4,560 EUR
measurements haut. 29 cm
alternate measurements 11 1/2 in
Description
Evoquant un personnage féminin stylisé, cette cuiller-pilon se distingue par sa belle ordonnance géométrique. Jouant sur une lecture à trois dimensions, le manche oblique fait glisser le regard en profondeur jusqu'à l'intérieur du cuilleron, tandis que la base conique est sculptée en décroché par rapport à l'axe du manche. Très belle patine brun rouge.









 


Kulango Pounder Spoon, Hammer Price: € 78,750,
Oceanic and African Art Auction,
Sale PF1017, Sotheby’s, Paris, France
2010









 


Kulango Pounder Spoon
H: 32 cm
CHF 1200,00 / € 970,00 / $ 1.304,00
Price includes stand.
2011
Galerie Walu / Jean David
African Art - Afrikanische Kunst - Art d'Afrique
Switzerland









 


23/11/11
Lombrail-Teucquam
Paris
France
EMail : LT-1@wanadoo.fr
Résultat : 1200 €
Lot n°79
CUILLÈRE-PILON KOULANGO évoquant une silhouette féminine. Incisions au niveau des seins. Trou de suspension à la partie supérieure. Patine d'usage brun clair.
Haut.: 33,5 cm









 


Vente aux enchères du Mercredi 12 décembre 2012
Collection Liuba et Ernesto Wolf : Art Tribal
Arts Premiers
Artcurial - Briest-Poulain-F.Tajan - Paris (France)
Lot 35 : CUILLER KULANGO, COTE D'IVOIRE
Estimation : 1 500 / 2 500 €
Le cuilleron de forme trapezoïdale est trés profond, le manche convexe décoré de rangées de petits diamants en relief
Jolie patine d'usage
19,50 cm (7,61 in.)








 


Quittenbaum auction, Germany
2012
Löffel / Stößel
103B 11
Zuschlag: 2000 €
Helles Holz. H. ca. 39 cm, Dm. ca. 9 cm. Laffe: 16 x 11 cm
Vgl. J. Kerchache, J.-L. Paudrat, L. Stephan, Die Kunst des Schwarzen Afrika, Paris 1988, Abb. 336;
vgl. Karl-Ferdinand Schaedler, Afrikanische Kunst, Von der Frühzeit bis heute, München 1997, S. 102, Abb. 55.
Provenienz: Süddeutsche Privatsammlung.









 


Bonham's auctions
20 Nov 2012 13:00 EST
New York
African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art
20065 54 Kulango Spoon, Ivory Coast
length 12 1/2in (30.5cm)
Wood
Provenance:
Colette Ghysels, Brussels
Marc & Denyse Ginzberg, New York
Published: Ginzberg, Marc, African Forms, Skira Editore, Italy, 2000, p 100
Sold for US$ 2,500 inc. premium









 


Native auctions, Wolstraat 32 Rue aux Laines 32 Bruxelles 1000 Brussel, Belgium.
A Kulango spoon
Wood
30,5 cm
Representing a stylized female character.
The geometric and sensual construction is composed of a large and round bowl, a trapezoid handle and a pestle figuring the hip of the abstract figure.
Beautiful patina on every part for every use.
Provenance: European Collection
Litterature:
Cuillers Sculptures, Musée Dapper, Paris, 1991, page 68.
Afrique, l'art des formes, Marc Ginzberg, Seuil, 2000, page 100.
Estimate: € 10 000 - 15 000
2013
unsold









 


offered for sale by Pecci, dealer in traditional African art in Brussels, Belgium, 2013
6000 Euro








 


Lempertz Auction 1063, African and Oceanic Art, 26.01.2016, 14:00, Brussels
A KULANGO SPOON
Lot 134
Result: €1.984
With deep oval bowl and conical base, dark patina.
28 cm. high
Provenance: Martien Coppens, Eindhoven (1908-1986)









 


Geometric Spoon
Wood
H: 11.5” (13.5" on base)
Inventory # 10413
for sale from African Plural Art, 1600$







 


A restrained and elegant wood spoon from the Kulango people of the Ivory Coast.
This S-shaped spoon shows nuanced carving with an indention in the middle segment that just echoes the small protrusion at the top of the bowl, with simple carved bands containing this detail, unfortunately barely visible in the photos.
With a beautiful dark brown patina, it measures 7-1/4" in height.
Ex private collection, Paris, since the 1950s.
#9116
$2600







 


South Africa?

Spoon


Wood.
Similar spoons have been attributed to the Tsonga and to the Zulu people from South Africa.

From a dealer in African objects in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2015.

Sold in 2016 for 15 Euro.









 


Other spoons and scoops have not been photographed and put in this WWW page, due to a lack of time

This document was updated most recently 2017-06


Feel free to contact me for additional information and appraisals: pnieuwen@vub.ac.be


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