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Damage Testing in Aeronautics

3 ECTS credits
85 h study time

Offer 1 with catalog number 4016299FNR for all students in the 2nd semester at a (F) Master - specialised level.

Information about this course is applicable on academic year 2017-2018.

Semester
2nd semester
Enrollment based on exam contract
Impossible
Grading method

Grading (scale from 0 to 20)

Can retake in second session
Yes
Enrollment requirements
Registration for Damage Testing in Aerodynamics is allowed if one has successfully accomplished or is registered for 30 ECTS of (semi)common courses of the standard learning path of the Master in Electromechanical Eng., AE track (Dutch program idem).
Taught in
English
Partnership agreement
  • Under interuniversity agreement for degree program
Faculty
Faculty of Engineering
Responsible organisation
Applied Mechanics
Educational Team:
Activities and contact hours
  • 24 contact hours Lecture
  • 12 contact hours Seminar, Exercises or Practicals
Course content

This course – based on research expertise – is mainly intended for master students in aeronautical engineering. The aim of this course is to provide theoretical knowledge as well as practical know-how in the field of damage testing, prevention and detection in aeronautics. The use of innovative materials such as composites (Glare, CFRP, GFRP, …) demands new testing and inspection techniques. Besides non-destructive testing, several experimental test procedures (flight test instrumentation, qualification testing, ground vibration testing, flight flutter testing) will be discussed. At the end of this course the student should be able to master the theory and to perform by himself/herself non-destructive inspections on airplane components (of moderate complexity). These skills will be trained during the practical classes. A visit to the NDT facilities of the Belgian Air force in Peutie is foreseen.

Course material
  • Digital course material (Required): The slides, scientific papers, and course notes can be accessed via PointCarré.
Additional info

For additional information, please contact Prof. Patrick Guillaume (office ZW.104; phone 02-629-3566; e-mail patrick.guillaume@vub.ac.be). The slides, scientific papers, and course notes can be accessed via PointCarré.

Programme Objectives

General competencies

At the end of this course the student should be able master the theory and to perform by himself/herself non-destructive inspections on airplane components (of moderate complexity). He/she should be able to interpret and properly analyse the test results; he/she should be able to communicate the conclusions in a precise and comprehensive way.

Scientific competences

Can work in an industrial environment with attention to safety, quality assurance, communication and reporting.

Scientific competences

Can develop, plan, execute and manage engineering projects at the level of a starting professional.

Scientific competences

Can think critically about and evaluate projects, systems and processes, particularly when based on incomplete, contradictory and/or redundant information.

Attitudes

Having a creative, problem-solving, result-driven and evidence-based attitude, aiming at innovation and applicability in industry.

Attitudes

Having a critical attitude towards one's own results and those of others.

Attitudes

Having consciousness of the ethical, social, environmental and economic context of his/her work and strives for sustainable solutions to engineering problems including safety and quality.

Attitudes

Having the flexibility and adaptability to work in an international and/or intercultural context.

Attitudes

Having an attitude of life-long learning as needed for the future development of his/her career.

Knowledge oriented competences

Having in-depth knowledge and understanding of exact sciences with the specificity of their application to engineering.

Knowledge oriented competences

Having in-depth knowledge and understanding of the advanced methods and theories to schematize and model complex problems or processes.

Knowledge oriented competences

Having a broad scientific knowledge, understanding and skills to be able to design, produce and maintain complex mechanical, electrical and/or energy systems with a focus on products, systems and services. E.g. codepo project, courses around renewable, sustainable mobility, ...

Knowledge oriented competences

Having an in-depth understanding of safety standards and rules with respect to mechanical, electrical and energy systems.

Scientific competences

Can reformulate complex engineering problems in order to solve them (simplifying assumptions, reducing complexity).

Scientific competences

Can conceive, plan and execute a research project, based on an analysis of its objectives, existing knowledge and the relevant literature, with attention to innovation and valorization in industry and society.

Scientific competences

Can present and defend results in a scientifically sound way, using contemporary communication tools, for a national as well as for an international professional or lay audience.

Scientific competences

Can collaborate in a (multidisciplinary) team.

Grading

The final grade is composed based on the following categories:

  • Oral Exam determines 70% of the final mark.
  • PRAC Report determines 30% of the final mark.

Within the Oral Exam category, the following assignments need to be completed:

Oral exam with a relative weight of 1 which comprises 70% of the final mark.

Note: The knowledge of the theoretical part will be evaluated by means of an oral exam (50%).

Within the PRAC Report category, the following assignments need to be completed:

Written reports with a relative weight of 1 which comprises 30% of the final mark.

Note: The evaluation of the practical skills acquired during the project work will be partly based on the written reports (30%)

Additional info with regard to grading

The knowledge of the theoretical part will be evaluated by means of an oral exam (50%).

The evaluation of the practical skills acquired during the project work will be partly based on the written reports (30%) and partly on the verbal communication during the oral exam (20%).